‘Career’ thing for GenZ

10 Things You Need to Know About Gen Z – Karen McCullough

I think we need to discuss the ‘career’ thing. Because many young people ask me ‘career’ advise. I know you get these requests too.

I am very careful in dispensing advise to young people, especially when I do not know them enough.

There are few reasons

1) Youth, especially Gen Z ( born after 1997) have placed mental health problems and bullying at the top of their issues list, according to the economist.
They are exam obsessed, spend lot of time on social media.
This is what the world they were born offered them. Parents want their children to have the best. They grow up with abundance. Many options in life. That just confuses them a lot. Attention is a scarce resource.

2) Jobs are changing. It will change at a rapid rate. It will never slow down. Our education system has no clue about what is happening in real world. We are stuck in 1940’s. industry 4.0 is upon us, but we are still doing stuff needed for second industrial revolution. This is on us, the adults. We will fail miserably if we do not change this system.

3) Gen Z is creative and smart. I am amazed by their performances. Workplaces and schools are not equipped to serve them. Yeah, that’s on us too.

So what is the solution ?

There are many, but these solutions need patience and attention in to individual aspirations. We need to get the basics right.

First place to start is there no such thing as a ‘career’.
It’s gone.
Yeah, that might seem a radical place to start. But it is the truth we are trying to avoid.

I am creating a framework for a module to help find purpose at an individual level through a workshop for GenZ. If you are interested to jump in with your ideas, energy, leads, or anything at all, drop a comment or email me at isura@isura.biz

Solving someone else’s problem

hey listen... - not-my-problem

In a SPRINT workshop I facilitated, there was a group that had participants with in the same domain but coming from different organisations. So the group had to select a real problem of only one organisation and design solutions for it. So there was just one problem owner and I requested others to work like consultants, consultants with fresh pair of eyes.

That did go well.

I saw the problem owner struggle with his emotions, judgments, attitude and trying to defend old ways of work patterns. The heaviness of him ‘owning’ the problem was a burden to move forward.

Others, with their consultant hats on, were doing really well coming up with creative solutions and persuading those ideas with the team.

Those fresh perspectives were very helpful for the problem owner. I was glad to see he was able to make good use of the team effort.

This is why it is easy for us to give someone else a life advise, but we cannot do what we told them when the exact same thing is required of us in our lives. The difference is the ownership of the problem.

“It is easy for you to say”

is actually true. :). It is indeed easy to solve someone else’s problem, but painfully hard when it’s our problem.

A simple way to solve my problem is to remove my self from it. Approach the situation as if I am solving someone else’s problem. Sounds ridiculous. I have practiced this approach nevertheless and happy to say it works most of the time.

How to do that step by step?
Will write soon.

Follow your passion. But…

We Need To Rethink Encouraging Our Kids To "Follow Your Passion"

We want to follow our passion through our jobs.
My passion is not your passion. It’s an individual unique feature. And passion changes and evolves with our age.
How can an organization cater for this ever changing needs of each and every individual? Organisations simply can’t do that. Not even Google.
So then how can you follow your passion?

Job is there to make you safe and sound. To give you some worth and financial safety.

Develop your passion beyond your job. Don’t expect your passion to be filled with in your job. Especially in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous times like this. That is a steep ask, an impossible one.

Find your passion in your own time. Make time for it.
(Cut time from social media scrolling, binging TV series, games, anything that is an addiction in your life).

Not having time for your passion is a lie we tell our selves over and over.
The excitement and energy generated through spending time on your passion trickles in to work and family. Vice versa.
That’s a good deal.

A day in FLOW.

Which Is Better for Learning: Focused vs Diffuse Thinking? | Brainscape Blog

In the morning I have done 2 hours of undisturbed work, Then took a break and followed up with another 3 hours of undisturbed work. I got so many things done. With in the process I have created my own framework for the GV-SPRINT which can be used in any number of days up to 5. That is something. Which means I am all good to facilitate a SPRINT workshop in any time frame, even with multiple groups. I even had the time to revamp the slide deck. All feel refreshed and reinvented. Guess I found my flow.

Seems easy, but had to do many things.
1) All the to-do lists were pushed for the next day to clear up the mind to focus on this one thing, with out any guilt.
2) Kept the phone on silent mode for the entire time.
3) Did not pick up the phone even in the break
4) All 5 hours were spent on one area of work. So mind was free to work deep.
5) Though I used the laptop, I used it with wifi off. When I wanted few resources to refer, I connected to internet and switched off again.
6) No social media, no emails.