compare

If you want to engage someone at work (who works below their capacity and they are making the effort to improve) don’t compare them with someone else in your organisation. 

Absolutely do not compare them with people in some other organisation, or their practices. 

Ever wonder, why someone who have performed exceptionally well in one organisation, then goes to a new organisation to fail miserably ? 

This behaviour comes from our need to compare numbers: they are doing well, we are not. 

Humans are not numbers. With the advent of big data, managers want to tag everything to a number, because it makes decision making easier. 

Yet if you really want to develop people, learn to trust them and coach them.  

Invest your time to learn why they are working in your organisation ? 

What keeps them motivated ?

People stick with managers who gets them. 

I have seen people working happily at a lower salary for years. They love their manager. I have seen Managers who cannot keep their team members from leaving them, despite offering higher salaries. Yes, there are many reasons to switch places, but have you ever wondered what is the first thing that triggers people to look elsewhere ?

It’s been just over a year since I moved from a full time job to be a business consultant. I have the opportunity to be working in several places,with different teams, including my final full time place of work. 

Initially I thought the transition would be easy. In-fact for first six months, I enjoyed the freedom of having the time to think more and the opportunity to work with different teams. It was exciting. 

In the next 6 months, it got tougher. It’s not that work has been too challenging. It is the change of position. From a position of power and authority, to a position of not having power and authority. From a position of leading to a position of influencing, not knowing if the changes I think needed, might take place. Without a warning, sometimes emotions can wreck me. For example, I can see a change is needed immediately, and I am thinking why others cannot see it. Yet after sometime I realise my job is not to effect change when I want to. Speed is not a sustainable success factor for me now.

My job is to create the space for teams to realise a specific change is needed or to articulate a need with clarity for all. (and sometimes with in that space, I realise, may be that change or the need, is not what we thought it would be)

I read many books, took online courses, discussed with many mentors, but this insight from my experience, is so important for my happiness and teams around me. 

We have different perceptions about the term ‘consultant’.

‘expensive people who have quick answers to problems of others’

‘experts who can talk, only talk,not having to sweat the new changes they bring in’. 

I am not surprised, because most of us had bad experiences with consultants. In my transition, in order for my work to be successful, to create that space, I have to wear different hats: Sometimes I am a moderator, sometimes I am a coach, sometimes I am a counsellor. There are times I am a nobody. I just be there. Not trying to fix anything. Yet, fully aware of the issues, trying to see a different angle, from the people around me.

I remember when I was down with depression some time back, working on my self like resting, sleeping, exercising, music and reading did not work much.

But I remember, one time I had the courage to help someone despite my condition. That changed everything. Knowing that the person was released, relaxed me internally.

The tensions I had evaporated. I could work on myself better.

It is counter-intuitive to much of self help band wagon out there. Yet it was that simple. The heart to help requires no money, no resources, just my willingness to commit unconditional space and time with someone who is in need.

What I found profound is that when I counsel someone, that conversation will be healing me. It will heal a situation in my mind like karma on the spot.